Christopher G Singer

TEMECULA, CA, US

U.S. Marine Corps

CPL, 3D CEB, (2D MAR DIV, II MEF FWD) 1ST MAR DIV, TWENTYNINE PALMS, CA

01/21/2012, HELMAND PROVINCE, AFGHANISTAN


U.S. Marine Corporal Christopher G. Singer was killed by hostile fire on Saturday, January 21, 2012 while on patrol in Helmand, a dangerous province in southern Afghanistan. He was a member of the 3rd Combat Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force based in Twentynine Palms, California. He was twenty-three years old. He was from Temecula, California.

Christopher Singer was a member of Chaparral High’s class of 2007. He joined the Marines shortly after graduation. It was well known that he had long sought to be a member of the Marine Corps. He could frequently be found wearing camouflage gear when he was growing up, and he used to play “Marine” with his friends. He also participated in Chaparral’s Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps program. He spent his military career at Camp Pendleton and at Twentynine Palms, serving as a member of the military police for part of that time. After recovering from a knee injury, he re-enlisted in December 2010 and deployed to Afghanistan in September 2011.

He loved working on antique engines with his grandfather and was a young man with strong Christian faith. Before deploying he told his wife ‘If I die, I don’t want people to mourn me. I want people to know I did everything I wanted to do in life and died doing what I loved.’

Christopher was a football fan who listed allegiances to both the Super Bowl-bound New England Patriots and San Diego Chargers on his Facebook page. He enjoyed teasing his friends when his teams succeeded. Like many members of his generation, he enjoyed playing such video games as “Halo” and “Call of Duty.” Later he would realize that his game time with “Call of Duty” came in handy as he made his way through basic training in San Diego and excelled at shooting targets while on the move. He kept in touch with fellow Marines and it was clear to everyone that Christopher had adjusted well to the extremely dangerous Afghanistan field work. Besides video fun times, Christopher would not hesitate to take a quiet walk with a friend who needed some encouragement and support.

His personal service awards include the Purple Heart, the Combat Action Ribbon, the Marine Corps Good Conduct medal, Afghanistan Campaign medal, Global War on Terrorism Service medal and the National Defense Service medal.

He leaves behind his wife and daughter, parents, and friends.

Chris’ portrait is also on Poster 13