Cody R Legg

Escondido, CA, US

U.S. Army

SGT, CO A, 1ST BN, 87TH INF, 1 BCT, FORT DRUM, NY

06/04/2008, TIKRIT, Iraq


Cody Legg was all Army. Since childhood all he wanted to be was a soldier. Bunnie Jacquay, Cody’s mother explained that Army was the only game for Cody and his friends. Cody grew up in Escondido. His childhood always included climbing trees, playing flashlight tag and planning missions. Cody proudly wore camouflage clothing and face paint. Both became parts of his uniform. Cody enlisted in the Army during senior year at San Pasqual High School in Escondido.

“Literally, you could find him and walk by him, and he was always in that mode: wanting to be an Army guy,” according to Dave Legg, his father.

Cody discussed becoming a firefighter or EMT once his tour in Iraq was over. He looked hopefully to a future with his girlfriend. SGT Legg died of wounds he sustained while trying to rescue two downed soldiers in his unit. Bunnie Jacquay said Army officials described Cody’s efforts to her: “He yelled, ‘Man down! Man down! I’m going in,’ and just took off to try to get them out of harm’s way.”

Cody was the person who often stood up for others. Even as a child he was “always looking out for the little guy,” his mother added. Cody had a natural instinct to look after his group. This was demonstrated during high school when he participated in several informal military training sessions. Cody is recalled as a great person, and leader who always took care of his soldiers.

Cody had the ability to put a humorous touch on dismal circumstances. Like his comments about Iraqi weather. Dave Legg said “He’d tell me how wonderful the weather was — about 120, dust blowing, couldn’t see 5 feet in front of him,” he said. “He’d joke that he wasn’t going to purchase any land there.”

Like most soldiers, Cody did not dwell on his time in combat. But his hopeful, bright outlook was contagious. Other families contacted Bunnie Jacquay to thank her for Cody’s leadership, and just plain great attitude in dealing with his soldiers. He was a real morale booster. “It seemed to broaden everybody’s world a little bit.”

Cody always stayed positive and had a good sense of humor to accompany his disposition. “His joy of life, his smile, could light up a room. He just had a zest for life that was contagious,”his mother said.

“The simple act of caring is heroic.” Edward Albert

Cody’s portrait is not yet on a poster